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Viswasam Movie Review

It is probably the first time that a leading actor like Ajith and director Siruthai Siva have collaborated for four consecutive films. By now, they have worked together for nearly 6 years, which is enough to analyse one's strength and weakness in their craft. Even after working together for half a decade, Ajith and Siva don't seem to have understood each other's work style or the audience's pulse.

They have put together their fourth outing, Viswasam, which was promoted as an emotional family entertainer. Going by the genre, this is yet another commercial flick that has every possible element of emotion ranging from father-daughter sentiment to brilliant action sequences.

Viswasam opens with Thooku Dorai (Ajith), who is regarded as the don and saviour (deadly combination, we know) of the Koduvilarpatti village. He is arguing with his enemies to seek permission to hold a 'thiruvizha' (carnival). That is when we come to know about Dorai's past and why his doctor-wife Niranjana left him.

Dorai and his boring sidekicks go to Mumbai to win back his love and reunite with his daughter. But his visit is complicated by villain Jagapati Babu.

Viswasam's story sounds like a decent commercial potboiler which could have worked if the director hadn't given it a pedantic treatment. However, Siva packages Viswasam with needless songs and age-old jokes in the name of comedy.

Thooku Dorai is said to be a don who uses his brain and brawn. And it's always a heavy punch that does the work for him. Ajith, in the last couple of years, has been doing roles which don't require him to be this animated on screen. However, Thooku Dorai forces him to be a flamboyant man, which is quite unlike him.

But Ajith shines and seems to have had fun playing this character. Though he looks out of place in a few scenes, he holds the entire film together. However, poorly-written dialogues and an underwhelming screenplay ruin the entire experience.

Nayanthara as doctor Niranjana looks ethereal and has a solid role in the film. She is a strong-willed woman who keeps herself happy by searching for greatness in everything she does. After one point, she is reduced to the stereotypical housewife, who chooses to become a mother by sacrificing a monumental career opportunity.

Another show stealer of Viswasam is the flawless performance by Baby Anikha. She has conveyed a lot of emotions without mouthing lengthy dialogues.

Director Siva still needs to hone his skills when it comes to screenplay writing. Though there is a flock of comedians in the film, none of them manages to make the audience laugh. They spout run-of-the-mill dialogues, which are annoying to hear.

Viswasam is a commercial film and it is a 'sin' to expect logic in movies like these. But there is something beyond logic: common sense. Take for example Nayanthara organising a free medical camp in a rice mill, which is clearly not one of the most hygienic places to treat patients.

Also, the film's runtime of 2 hours and 45 minutes works against it. If Viswasam had been made as a telefilm, it would have had a better impact. Towards the climax, the director explores the dad-daughter sentiment and gives a subtle lesson in good and bad parenting.

Stunt choreographer Dilip Subbarayan does a brilliant job with the action sequences, which are neatly captured.

D Imman's songs are a huge letdown; however, he redeems himself with the fantastic background score. The five songs in the album add nothing to the story.

Ideally, the now-viral Adchi Thooku song should have been Ajith's introduction song. Siva places it in the second half and by the time the audience sees it, they're disappointed with the story.

Viswasam is another opportunity wasted. Even after three attempts, it is quite sad to know that Siva hasn't cracked the success formula.

After churning out an underwhelming spy thriller Vivegam, Ajith and director Siruthai Siva go back to the rural route with Viswasam. But the film does not do justice to expectations and is impressive only in parts, says our review.

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